Archives

Robotics Engineering

Impacts of Robotics Engineering on Our World: An Introduction to Real World Robots

 

The robotics engineering course is designed for high-school students to provide them with understanding of robotics as an engineering discipline. The participating students will learn about a number of newly emerging robotics technologies and their impacts on a variety of areas ranging from industrial sectors, such as manufacturing, medical, defense; home assistance to elderly and disabled people; to improving learning for autistic children/students. The main goal of the course is to motivate the students in pursuing robotics as an engineering discipline by providing them an introduction to behind the scenes science and art of robotics. The course will involve interactive and fun-filled group sessions that include video lectures, interacting with real world robots, and hands-on programming.

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the robotics as an engineering discipline, state of the art in robotics and the relevant skills and knowledge required to become a roboticist.
  • Describe the nature and type of research work conducted in robotics in various state of the art robotics disciplines and the impact of those on our world.
  • Develop problem solving, critical thinking, and programming skills.

UConn PCS: Robotics Engineering

Sessions Offered

 Session 1: July 10 - July 16

Format

On Campus, In Person

Related Courses

Biomedical Engineering

This class will provide introduction to robotics engineering, introduction to real world robots, and hands-on experience to students. The students will get to experience:

  • Interactive introductory lectures on history of robotics and overview of robotics engineering as an interdisciplinary field.
  • An overview of the three main areas of robotics engineering using a mix of video tutorials and class discussions. The areas are: Bio-robots, Human-robot interaction, Autonomous robots
  • An invigorating hands-on experience of discovering the intricacies of electrical circuit wiring, programming on microcontrollers, and robot building using kits.
  • Interaction with real world robots

UConn PCS: Robotics Engineering

UConn PCS: Robotics Engineering

UConn PCS: Robotics Engineering

Meet the Professors


 

Shalabh Gupta received his M.S. degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering, and his Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA, in 2004, 2005, and 2006, respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut. His current research interests include distributed autonomy, cyber–physical systems, robotics, network intelligence, data analytics, information fusion, and fault diagnosis in complex systems. Dr. Gupta is currently serving as the Chief Editor of Frontiers in Robotics and AI (Specialty Section: Smart Sensor Networks and Autonomy) and an Associate Editor of Structural Health Monitoring: An International Journal. Dr. Gupta has published around 120 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers.

UConn PCS: Abhishek DuttaAbhishek Dutta received his MSc in informatics from the University of Edinburgh with informatics prize for outstanding thesis in 2007 and his PhD with distinction in electromechanical engineering from Ghent University in 2014. He was then an aerospace postdoc at the coordinated science laboratory of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign till 2016. Since 2016 he is an assistant professor of ECE at UConn and is affiliated to BME and UTC-IASE. His research lab is focused on systems medicine that deals with disease network modeling and control and on biological robotics dealing with neuromuscular control of insects.

UConn PCS: Ashwin DaniAshwin Dani received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Florida (UF), Gainesville, FL, USA, in 2008 and 2011, respectively. After graduation from Ph.D., he was a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. In 2013, he joined4 the faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) as Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests related to robotics engineering include human–robot collaboration, autonomous navigation of robots, nonlinear estimation and control, and machine learning. Dr. Dani actively participates in outreach and teaching activities related to robotics at UConn and is an active researcher in the field of controls and robotics.

Data Science

Learning Data Science Through Games and Applications

Data science is a fast developing science of extracting meaningful information from massive data for better decision-making. It is interdisciplinary by nature, involving statistics, computing, and domain knowledge. Important principles of data science will be elaborated through interactive games and real applications in this course.

Students will have a basic understanding of the essential components of data science as well as the basic computing skills needed to explore this field further independently. The fun, game-based introductions will engage students' interest in data science.

UConn PCS: Data Science

Sessions Offered

Session 1: July 10 - July 16

Course Fees

To Be Announced

Cost, Fees, & Discounts

Format

On-Campus, In-Person

Related Courses

TBD

Lectures will be team-led by Professors Haim Bar, HaiYing Wang, and Jun Yan, with lab sessions led by graduate assistants. Students taking this class will get the chance to:

  • understand most important principles in data science;
  • learn the basics of data science computing skills - data manipulation, visualization, and analysis;
  • program in R to run simulations of games;
  • practice on real applications with data from climate change to sports.

UConn PCS: Data Science

UConn PCS: Data Science

UConn PCS: Data Science

Meet the Teaching Team


 


UConn PCS: Haim BarHaim Bar is an Associate Professor in Statistics at the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Cornell University in 2012. He received his M.Sc. in statistics in 2010 (Cornell University) and an M.Sc. in computer science in 2002 (Yale University). He received his bachelor's degree in mathematics (Cum Laude) in 1993, at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

His professional interests include statistical modeling, shrinkage estimation, high throughput applications in biology (e.g., genomics), Bayesian statistics, variable selection, and machine learning. From 1995 to 1997, he was with Motorola, Israel, as a computer programmer in the Wireless Access Systems Division. From 1997 until 2003 he worked for MicroPatent, LLC, where he held the position of Director of Software Development. In 2003 he moved to Ithaca, NY, and worked as a Principal Scientist at ATC-NY. Prior to coming to UConn, he worked at the Cornell Statistical Consulting Unit (CSCU) and the Department of Statistical Science at Cornell, as a consultant and lecturer.


UConn PCS: HaiYing WangHaiYing Wang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at the University of Connecticut. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of New Hampshire from 2013 to 2017. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Department of Statistics at the University of Missouri in 2013, and his M.S. from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006. His research interests include informative subdata selection for big data, model selection, model averaging, measurement error models, and semi-parametric regression.

UConn PCS: Jun YanJun Yan is a Professor of Statistics at the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in Statistics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 2003. He was an Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa before joining UConn in 2007. His research interests include survival analysis, clustered data analysis, multivariate dependence, spatial extremes, and statistical computing. He is actively involved in applications and education of data science in public health, climate change, ecology, and sports. He has a special interest in making advanced statistical methods widely accessible via open-source software. Dr. Yan is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and is the Editor of the Journal of Data Science.

More info is available at http://merlot.stat.uconn.edu/~jyan/.

Pre-Vet: Marine Animal Health and Veterinary Science

Immerse yourself in the marine world and explore your passions for veterinary science, animal care, animal training and research.

The Pre-Vet: Marine Animal Health and Veterinary Science course will be hosted at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, CT where students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the marine world. Throughout this course students will be interacting with aquarium research scientists, veterinarians, animal trainers and animal rescue professionals to understand the science behind their work. Students will gain knowledge and experience through labs and activities focused on animals at Mystic Aquarium including penguins, seals, reptiles and fishes.

Through this course students will participate in labs, tours and activities that will increase their scientific literacy in genetics, hematology, microbiology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn about careers and education/career pathways directly from working professionals to understand if animal health and veterinary science is a desirable education and career path. Journal discussions will develop students’ skills in reading and analysis of primary scientific literature.

The course involves off-site visits to Mystic Aquarium and the UConn, Avery Point Campus. Supervised transportation is provided by the program and is included in the course cost and fees. Parents/guardians and students will be required to submit Mystic Aquarium participation forms prior to attending this course.

Sessions Offered

Session 2: July 17 – July 23

Format

On-Campus, In-Person

Related Courses

Marine Biology

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Learn about a wide variety of careers in animal health and veterinary science, from professionals in all stages of their careers.
  • Participate in lab programs focused on hematology, microbiology, molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, and learn how each is utilized to analyze an animal’s health.
  • Observe feeding and training sessions with beluga whales, penguins and sea lions, and have the opportunity to learn from and ask questions of their animal care teams.
    • Please note: students will not have direct encounters with marine mammals.
  • Visit behind-the-scenes areas to view animal care, research and veterinary staff at work. This will include a visit to the animal rescue clinic to understand the veterinary care of both animals at the aquarium temporarily for rehabilitation as well as animals permanently in our care.
  • Explore current topics in marine mammal research during journal article discussions.

UConn PCS: Pre-Vet

UConn PCS: Pre-Vet

UConn PCS: Pre-Vet

Meet the Professor


 

UConn PCS: Maureen DriscollMaureen Driscoll, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Residence of Marine Sciences

Dr. Driscoll is a research scientist at Mystic Aquarium where she has worked for the last 6 years conducting research to assess the health of marine animals. Her two primary areas of focus are 1) developing methods to measure hormones and other biomarkers in alternative matrices such as feces, saliva, respiratory blow, and feathers; and 2) documenting the microbiomes of marine animals to see how bacterial communities contribute to their overall health. Her projects have focused on beluga whales, African penguins, seals, walruses, and amphibians. Dr. Driscoll received her B.S. in Biology from Salem State University, Salem MA and was awarded a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology with a concentration in Microbiology from the University of Rhode Island. She is also an Assistant-Professor-in-Residence at UConn, where she lectures for several Marine Biology courses. This is her forth summer teaching the Pre-vet course.

Maureen Driscoll, PhD, (https://marinesciences.uconn.edu/person/maureen-driscoll/) Research Fellow, Assistant Professor in Residence of UConn Marine Sciences.

Marine Biology

Learn how scientists are studying the effect a changing climate has on marine life

The course is designed to provide an overview of the interaction between marine life and ocean processes. When we study living things in the ocean and how they interact with their environment we actually study marine ecology. We will use Long Island Sound as our outdoor laboratory to study coastal marine ecology and learn the tools marine biologists and oceanographers use to understand the impact of climate change and human activity on marine life. Marine scientists use the data and results from research of ocean processes such as ocean temperatures, currents, chemistry, geology and as well as biology to plan and carry out conservation measures to protect marine life.

Our goals for you once you have completed this program are:
1) That you leave the program with a better understanding of how scientists discover and explain the workings of the natural world
2) How oceanography helps us to appreciate and manage our planet
3) Marine Biology includes life from the microscopic algae to largest of whales and their survival depends upon our stewardship of the oceans.

This will be accomplished by touching on specific principles of marine biology and marine science in general, applying some mathematical analysis, and hypothesis testing and applying reasoning that will converge all our topics to not only develop a better appreciation of the marine environment.

Elements of marine chemistry and marine physics are explored using instrumentation.  You will collect data from field measurements and chemical analysis and record qualitative observations. Homework will be comprised of generating graphs and contemplating questions we plan to discuss during the next class.  The discussions about the data and observations will generate a final group “report” on Baker’s Cove as a snapshot of the health of Eastern Long Island Sound.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed two years of high school science and math through Algebra I to take this course.  High School transcripts will be evaluated to confirm this requirement has been met.  

UConn PCS: Marine Biology

Sessions Offered

Session 1: July 10 - July 16

Format

On Campus, In Person

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Measure and interpret coastal ocean properties in the laboratory and using instruments on the water: salinity, oxygen, temperature and nutrients
  • Determine how these properties affect marine life composition
  • You will observe and explore several different types of coastal marine habitats
  • Marine biology hands-on topics: the algae and seaweeds, invasive species, invertebrate ecology, fish seining, dissections of preserved animals
  • Apply some mathematical analysis, hypothesis testing and reasoning that will converge all our topics to develop a better appreciation of the marine environment.
  • Learn the types of conservation methods and restoration efforts that are taking place globally and locally

UConn PCS: Marine Biology

UConn PCS: Marine Biology

UConn PCS: Marine Biology

Meet the Professor


 

Dr. Claudia Koerting has been a scientist, faculty member and academic advisor in the department of marine sciences for nearly twenty years and she has been teaching at UConn for nearly 30 years. Her research at UConn has included marine benthic ecology, detection and ecology of marine pathogens and analysis of toxin producing microalgae but she now focuses on water quality. She is the undergraduate program coordinator for Marine Sciences. Currently Dr. Koerting teaches several undergraduate courses and mentors undergraduate research projects. Her interests and research continue in the fields of marine chemistry and marine microbiology.

Professor Koerting

Environmental Conservation

Explore local ecosystems and environmental solutions

Are you looking for an adventure this summer? Do you enjoy greenspaces or local waterbodies, and want to learn how to protect them? The Environmental Conservation course will provide you with a hands-on field experience to study and learn about local environments. By the end of the course, you will be empowered with tools you can use to carry out environmental solutions in your own community.

By the end of this course, you will gain essential skills of a field biologist, become familiar with environmental career pathways and leave with an actionable plan to address a current environmental issue in your community.

Sessions Offered

Session 4: July 31 - August 6

Format

On-Campus, In-Person

Related Courses

GEOPATHS: Geoscience

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • A range of environmental topics, including wildlife & fisheries, water & green infrastructure, and forestry;
  • Field techniques and tools used by ecologists and researchers to study the environment;
  • Environmental careers presented by professionals from different environmental sectors; and
  • Solutions to pressing environmental issues.

PCS Environmental Conservation

PCS Environmental Conservation

PCS Environmental Conservation

Meet the Professors


 

Nicole Freidenfelds is the Program Coordinator for NRCA's Conservation Training Partnerships (CTP) program, and a Visiting Assistant Extension Educator in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment at UConn. She received her B.S. in Biology at Eastern Connecticut State University and her M.S. in Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire.

In her previous role as a research scientist, Nicole mainly focused on studying the behavior, ecology and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. As CTP coordinator, Nicole is currently overseeing a wide range of unique and exciting conservation projects being conducted by teen-adult teams throughout the state.

Professor Freidenfelds

Dr. Laura Cisneros is an Assistant Extension Professor in the Department of Natural Resources & the Environment and Institute of the Environment at UConn. She received her B.S. in Zoology at Michigan State University and her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UConn. Laura's Ph.D. research explored the effects of human-modified landscapes on bat communities, and identified landscape characteristics that promote biodiversity and vital services provided by bats (e.g. pollination, seed dispersal).

Currently, Laura works with UConn’s Natural Resources Conservation Academy (NRCA) to develop and implement place-based, environmental action programs that integrate technology used by professionals and support intergenerational (e.g., teen & adult teams) community conservation projects. Her integrated research efforts center on understanding how environmental action programs and citizen science impact capacity to address environmental issues.

Professor Cisneros

Pharmacy: Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Discovery

Develop a working knowledge of the drug discovery process

This course will provide students with an overview of the entire drug development process. We will start with how pharmaceutical companies determine what disease they want to target and work our way through the entire discovery process over the one-week course, ending with post-approval monitoring by the FDA. Along the way, we will answer a variety of specific topics including the following: what is a lead compound, what are drug-drug and drug-food interactions, and how do clinical trials work. Much of our discussion on these topics will revolve around the development of currently used drugs such as Lipitor (high cholesterol), Januvia (type II diabetes), and Harvoni (hepatitis C).

By the end of their week in this course, students will be able to describe the general steps taken by a pharmaceutical company to produce a drug. Students will also gain hands on experience in both chemistry and biochemistry-based science experiments. Finally, students will be introduced to several career options associated with drug discovery, research, and pharmacy.

Sessions Offered

Session 1: July 10 - July 16

Format

On Campus, In Person

Related Courses

Chemistry

Pharmacy Practice

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Students will learn key steps of the drug discovery process.
  • Students will learn about the interdisciplinary nature of drug research.
  • Students will perform several chemistry-based experiments in the lab.
  • Students will perform an experiment to test the anti-bacterial properties of several compounds.
  • Students will tour several research labs at UConn.

UConn PCS Chemistry

Chemistry Course

Chemistry Course

Meet the Professor


 

Dr. Kyle Hadden

Dr. Kyle Hadden is Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and the Director of Research and Graduate Programs in the School of Pharmacy at UConn. He received his BS in Chemistry from Wofford College in 2000 and his PhD in Medicinal Chemistry from the Medical University of South Carolina in 2004. Dr. Hadden started his independent career at the University of Connecticut in 2009. Throughout his career, Dr. Hadden’s primary research interests have been the early stage development of small molecules as anti-cancer chemotherapeutics and several projects in this area are ongoing in the Hadden lab.

As the Director of Research and Graduate Programs, Professor Hadden plays a primary role in the recruitment and progression of graduate students. He also works directly with other faculty in the Department and School to enhance individual and collaborative research efforts. Professor Hadden teaches in both the pharmacy and graduate curriculum at UConn and has mentored a wide-range of students and postdoctoral fellows in his research lab.

Pharmacy Practice

Pharmacy's Exciting and Growing Impact on Patient-Centered and Team-Based Care

Students will be exposed to many different aspects of the pharmacy profession that will allow them to learn the different roles pharmacists have in healthcare. There will be opportunities to hear from pharmacists in different fields of pharmacy such as community/retail, ambulatory care, health system/hospital, regulatory, managed care, and industry speak of their backgrounds and what they currently do in their positions. There will also be hands on opportunities to observe pharmacists in action and even practice some skills used by pharmacists!

There are several desired outcomes from the course. First, it is expected that students understand the specific valuable roles pharmacist can play in patient care. Second, students come away with an appreciation of how their interests and career needs fit within the field of pharmacy. Third, students will gain basic skills and literacy for medication information and monitoring that they can use as a foundation to provide background to others less knowledgeable about the medication use process. Forth, students will learn to synthesize medical information into a presentation and have experience doing a poster presentation on an important medication-related topic.

Pharmacy immunization

Sessions Offered

Session 2: July 17 – July 23

Format

On Campus, In Person

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Describe the pathways to becoming a pharmacist.
  • Describe what individual characteristics would be most helpful for pharmacists to have to practice pharmacy.
  • Identify the different activities pharmacists perform in different practice settings.
  • Observe and performs some pharmacist tasks and how to manage selected pharmacy challenges.
  • Create educational materials/posters to show learning and application of medication information.
  • Critiques different technologies involving medication use.

Pharmaceutical chemicals

Pharmacy student

Medication, syringe, and laptop

Meet the Professor


 

Professor Rickles

Dr. Nathaniel ("Nate") Rickles is an Associate Dean of Admissions and Student Affairs and Professor of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy. He received his B.S. in psychology and chemistry from Dickinson College, Pharm.D. from the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, M.S. and Ph.D. in the Social and Administrative Sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Rickles also completed a psychiatric pharmacy practice residency and is board certified in this area. He was inducted as a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association. He came to the UCONN School of Pharmacy in 2016. He taught previously at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) and Long Island University (Brooklyn, NY).

His primary research interests are to develop, implement, and evaluate intervention programs that improve community pharmacist communication with patients and/or other team members to subsequently improve medication adherence and patient safety for several patient populations including those with mental illness/substance disorders, geriatrics, and those at risk for health disparities. His research on medication adherence has explored measurement of adherence, factors affecting medication adherence, and interventions to improve adherence. Dr. Rickles also explores educational methods to improve the teaching of communication skills. His primary teaching interests involve courses on communication skills, health promotion, cross-cultural health care, and research methods. He has published approximately 45 peer-reviewed publications, invited to present at more than 40 local, national, and international meetings, and presented 50 peer-reviewed posters or podium presentations at local, national, or international professional meetings. He had led and/or co-led several national, state and local research grants and continues to actively be involved in grants and publications. Dr. Rickles was the lead editor on the third edition of the textbook Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmaceutical Care.

GEOPATHS Intro to Geoscience

The Earth, The Environment, and You

Geoscientists study all aspects of the Earth, including its history, structure, rocks, soils, rivers, oceans and atmosphere. The UConn Geoscience pre-college course will introduce this wide-ranging discipline and discuss how earth and environmental scientists play a crucial role in understanding and making predictions about a diverse range of earth resources, processes and hazards, from mineral deposits to earthquakes to floods and climate change.

The UConn Geoscience pre-college course will integrate:

  • lectures and dynamic learning modules on background geoscience material
  • field and lab demonstrations
  • collection and analysis of rock, soil and water samples
  • guest visits from Geoscience faculty across the wide range topics in the discipline

Sessions Offered

Session 3: July 24 – July 30

Format

On-Campus, In-Person

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • The many aspects of Geological & Environmental Science and the diverse methods and approaches Geoscientists used to study the Earth and Environment.
  • How to analyze the mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of rocks, soil, water and sediments.
  • How to understand and interpret the geologic history of Connecticut.

UConn PCS: GEOPATHS

UConn PCS: GEOPATHS

UConn PCS: GEOPATHS

Meet the Professors


 

UConn PCS: William OuimetWilliam Ouimet, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geosciences

Dr. Ouimet (Will) is an Associate Professor of Geosciences at UConn. He loves working with students outdoors and on field trips, and it’s one of the reasons he became a Geologist. His research and teaching involves the study of erosion, rivers, landslides and environmental change around the world, as well as the influence of human activities. He works in the field, where he collects samples and maps out geological features, in the lab, where he analyzes rocks, water, soil and sediment, and on the computer, where he explores remote sensing datasets of the earth and uses models to simulate how landscapes change through time. His research has taken him all over world, from the Colorado Rockies, to Greece, Tibet, Taiwan, and the Bahamas. It has also allowed him to appreciate and explore the geology underfoot and processes at play here in southern New England, right where he grew up.


UConn PCS: Mike HrenMichael Hren, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geosciences

Dr. Hren (Mike) is also an Associate Professor of Geosciences at UConn. His research and teaching is focused on understanding how Earth’s climate, ecosystems, and environment evolve over time and how Earth’s history informs its future. His work takes him to mountain ranges around the globe, from the high peaks of Patagonia to the mountains of Tibet to the Sierra Nevada of California, where he and his students collect sediment, rocks, soils and water to bring back to UConn for analysis. He is the director of the Stable Isotope and Organic Molecular Biogeochemistry laboratory, and when not traveling for research, can be found working in the laboratory with students and colleagues from UConn and visitors from around the world analyzing modern and ancient plants, sediments and even an occasional woolly mammoth, to understand Earth and life through time.

Chemistry

Chemistry: The Science of Balancing Equations

Everyone tells you that STEM education is important and that being a scientist, engineer or doctor is an excellent career path. Most people know Engineers build stuff and doctors heal people but what do scientists (specifically chemists) do? We’ll use each session to carry out fun hands on experiments that show different career paths open to chemists or other basic science majors.

There are hundreds of career paths you can follow as a science major. Helping sick people is a noble profession but it isn't for everyone. When you finish the course we hope you will have a better idea of some of the professions that STEM classes can prepare you for.

Sessions Offered

Session 3: July 24 - July 30

Format

On Campus, In Person

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Pharmaceuticals: Aspirin synthesis
    • Chemists do drug synthesis
  • Natural products and pigments: Ultramarine- making one of the most expensive paints
    • Chemists make all of your favorite colors
  • Metallurgy: The golden penny experiment
    • Chemists use metals for all sorts of things
  • Innovative materials: Superconductor synthesis and things that glow
    • Chemists developed all of your LEDs and OLED screens.
  • Cosmetics: The chemistry of scents
    • Chemists were involved if it smelled good or was a pretty color. Chemists also make lots of things that look like mud and smell bad.
  • Food: Molecular gastronomy and artificial flavors in food.
    • Chemists had something to do with all those ingredients on a food package that you can’t pronounce.

UConn PCS Chemistry

Chemistry Course

Chemistry Course

Meet the Professor


 

Image of Clyde CadyClyde Cady, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in Residence in the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Cady received his undergraduate degree from the University of Minnesota where he was introduced to bioinorganic chemistry, the chemistry of the elements as pertaining to life events. He moved to Connecticut for his Ph.D. at Yale University where he studied photosynthesis. After postdoctoral studies at Uppsala University, Sweden, and Rutgers University he started teaching general and inorganic chemistry at UConn. His special interests are directed toward introducing pre-college students to the thrills of experimental chemistry.

Biomedical Engineering

Solving our Healthcare Needs: Role of Biomedical Engineering

Exploring the tools biomedical engineers use to advance progress and make discoveries in healthcare and medicine

Biomedical Engineering is a confluence of engineering, computer science, and life science, and aims to solve health problems and thereby improve the quality of life. Being such a broad field, the typical college freshman can be overwhelmed with understanding what biomedical engineering is specifically about, finding out which of the sub-disciplines aligns with their interests, and most importantly determining whether the field is one that they would want to pursue a career in. This is an introductory, hands-on course that offers students the opportunity to acquaint themselves with biomedical engineering principles and their applications in the design of medical devices. Such devices form the backbone of medical procedures such as imaging, disease diagnosis and treatment, as well as the restoration of the functions of injured organs and body parts. Some of the topics to be explored are electro-physiological measurement devices, 3D designing and printing, and computer software for biological data analysis.

After completion of the course, students will demonstrate an understanding of the role of biomedical engineering in medical device innovation and technology, and describe the sub-disciplines of biomedical engineering and background required to be proficient in each area. Through hands-on design and prototyping of basic biomedical devices, students will develop problem analysis and solving, critical thinking, team work, and engineering skills.

UConn PCS: Biomedical Engineering

Sessions Offered

Session 2: July 17 - July 23

Session 4: July 31 - August 6

 

Format

On Campus, In Person

Related Courses

Chemistry

This class is meant to be immersive and students will experience:

  • Learn about the various research work biomedical engineers are currently pursuing, and the knowledge and skills needed to be competent in the field
  • Design and build basic medical device prototypes
  • Use a computer-aided design (CAD) software to design 3-dimensional (3D) physical structures and print them using a 3D printer

UConn PCS: Biomedical Engineering

UConn PCS: Biomedical Engineering

UConn PCS: Biomedical Engineering

Meet the Professor


 

Patrick Kumavor is an associate professor-in-residence in the biomedical engineering department of the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Connecticut in 2008. Dr. Kumavor has worked on a plethora of research activities ranging from ultra-secure encryption systems to biomedical diagnostic instruments for early-stage cancer detection. He has also taught courses in Foundations of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Measurements, Bioinstrumentation, Bioinstrumentation optics, Junior Design, and Senior Design. In addition, he’s worked with several undergraduate students on Independent Research Study Projects. Dr. Kumavor’s present interest is working with undergraduate students to stimulate in them a passion for science and engineering.

Patrick Kumavor